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Theme Analysis Essay

Essay on Great Expectations Theme Analysis

1256 Words6 Pages

Since it was first published over 150 years ago, Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations has come to be known as a timeless and remarkably moving work of literature. It is considered to be one of Dickens’ most recognizable works, and is celebrated for its meaningful, universally-believed themes. In order for this novel to be properly understood, a thoughtful analysis of its major themes must be given.
Socio-Economic Status and Hierarchy The ones who seem to be most affected by society’s beliefs about class and social order are Pip, his family, and his friends, who would definitely fall under the “lower” part of the socio-economic ladder. Throughout the novel, the “lower” characters have a heightened and even a bit unhealthy obsession with…show more content…

Since it was first published over 150 years ago, Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations has come to be known as a timeless and remarkably moving work of literature. It is considered to be one of Dickens’ most recognizable works, and is celebrated for its meaningful, universally-believed themes. In order for this novel to be properly understood, a thoughtful analysis of its major themes must be given.
Socio-Economic Status and Hierarchy The ones who seem to be most affected by society’s beliefs about class and social order are Pip, his family, and his friends, who would definitely fall under the “lower” part of the socio-economic ladder. Throughout the novel, the “lower” characters have a heightened and even a bit unhealthy obsession with class status. This is first seen when the character Miss Havisham is introduced; Uncle Pumblechook and the Gargery’s, Mrs. Joe especially, are elated that Pip will have an association with Miss Havisham, a very wealthy spinster. They believe that Pip and Miss Havisham’s association will both increase their wealth and social class, with Mrs. Joe proclaiming, “this boy’s (Pip’s) fortune may be made by his going to Miss Havisham’s…” (Dickens 82). At first, young Pip does not care for such beliefs, but as he becomes older, he begins to internalize them, and he himself starts to develop a sense of social order. It might have become established during his first encounter with Miss Havisham’s, in which he is severely ridiculed by Estella to the

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