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Commemorative Speech Outline Essays On Friendship

Third Claim

Starting Sentence Option 1: According to [study], [statistics on friendship]. This leads us to conclude that [third claim].

Starting Sentence Option 2: Friendship has been around since the beginning of time. [study] shows that [statistics]. It seems then, that the logical [conclusion/thing to do] is [actions], as [third claim],

  • Studies show that having friends ensures a happier, healthier life.
  • For many, a good friendship is more important than a good relationship with their spouse.
  • Habits can be made or broken according to what your close friends do or say.
  • Friends are so important because we choose them. They are not born into our family or forced to interact with us as with co-workers.
  • Humans were never meant to be alone and thrive in situations where they can have plenty of social interaction, so friendships are a must.

Friends More Important Than Family

Friendship Study

The Importance of Friendship

If you are responsible for writing a commemorative speech for someone who has passed away or for a special event that commemorates a person, place, or event, you need to make sure you invest time and energy into writing something meaningful, respectful, and courteous. When making a tribute to someone or something with your words, you let others know you care, and you highlight why this person, place, or organization was and continues to be important in the world.

Brainstorming Topic Ideas

Before writing a commemorative speech, brainstorm some ideas for information that you could include in your speech.

  • What memories, ideas, or information about this person would you want to share with a greater audience?
  • How can you respectfully share the significance of this person with others?
  • What stories would you want to hear when listening to this commemorative speech? 

Your aim is to make the audience remember and to express yourself in order to motivate others to feel strongly as well. Sometimes these speeches are filled with emotion, and other times, they are filled with inspiration, hope, and information.

Commemorative Speechwriting

When writing, make sure that you have friends, family, and colleagues listen to your work and help you make your point very clear. The spoken word – especially when words are caught between tears of sadness – can be difficult to understand, so something on paper that makes sense might not be easy to understand aloud. You are going to need to rely on others for advice about changing phrasing, word order, and even speech patterns so that what you write becomes comprehensible. Keep this in mind as you formulate your speech on paper. 

Think about the person, place, or other thing that is being praised through your speech.

  • Can you balance tradition and formality with personal touches within your speech?
  • Make sure that your words are respectful: Lots of people will hear this speech, and some might judge you based upon the stories you share and the speech elements you include. 
  • Write from the heart. It is obvious when you are speaking about something you care very little about.

If you are not inspired, talk to others who have been motivated and inspired by the thing you are commemorating, and see if you can draw ideas and inspiration from their passion.  

Tips and Tricks for Writing Your Best Speech

Recognize that you will probably be speaking in front of an audience of different backgrounds – some people might be very familiar with the topics you discuss, while some might be listening to this information for the first time.

  • You should seek clarity in your speech and should be clear with your words. For example, take the time to explain things instead of using jargon that might go over some people’s heads.
  • Do not talk down to an audience of professionals. Achieve a tone that is reserved and respectful instead of boastful of your own knowledge. 

Remember that this speech is not about you, nor is it in reality about the person being commemorated. The key is to speak for the audience. You are really there to help people deal with their feelings, let them express themselves, and to represent the collective voice.  

Do not use this speech as a chance for self-promotion or to share your hubris. If you are worried about how people will perceive you – such that your boss will be in attendance, or someone else who can help you move ahead in life – remember that if you can give a selfless speech, this will speak more than threading personal pats-on-the-back throughout your speech.

When writing a commemorative speech, keep it simple, respectful, and honorable, and people will want to listen.

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Writing a Commemorative Speech

By YourDictionary

If you are responsible for writing a commemorative speech for someone who has passed away or for a special event that commemorates a person, place, or event, you need to make sure you invest time and energy into writing something meaningful, respectful, and courteous. When making a tribute to someone or something with your words, you let others know you care, and you highlight why this person, place, or organization was and continues to be important in the world.