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Democratic Peace Thesis Examples For Argumentative Essay

Essay on Democratic Peace

1477 Words6 Pages

Democratic Peace Democratic peace is presently a theory that has come under fire from many individuals due to the complex nature in which it is applied to nations and their handling of foreign affairs. There are currently two accepted arguments: (1) Democracies do not fight one another because they are self-organizing systems and are therefore fundamentally distinct from other states, and (2) they are as prone to conflict with no democracies or quasi-democracies as no democracies are with one another. These views on democratic peace are one of a “… dyadic effect, which implies that democracies are only more…show more content…

Democracies are generally involved in the practice of liberal economic policy, meaning that to an extent international trade between many nations is undertaken. If one democratic nation is heavily involved in trade relations with another democratic nation then it is in neither of these nations best interest to get involved in a conflict that requires military intervention. “The possibility of a spurious correlation between domestic and international politics has been explored by an increasing number of researchers with results that seem to indicate that liberalism is at least partially responsible for the democratic peace” (Gartzke 3).

Another explanation for democracies remaining at peace with one another is because they are self-organizing systems. “As systems, liberal democracies have more in common with science and the market than with undemocratic governments. These similarities explain their peaceful relationships with one another” (diZerega 280). Because democracies are not hierarchically structured, they do not suffer from the problems hierarchical institutions do. A hierarchical government faces the problems of setting specific goals, and once these goals are set the system either achieves its goals or fails and disintegrates. With constitutional rules in place, a democratic system

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Essay about The concept of the Democratic Peace Theory

1763 Words8 Pages

Democratic Peace Theory The concept of the Democratic Peace Theory is based on the idea that whether states are likely to go to war or choose peace depends on the type of political system they have.

There are three sub divisions 1) Monadic; Democracies that tend to be generally peaceful and are not likely to go to war, although people (can you identify people) who argue this only examine the years 1960-1970.
2) Dyadic; This version is the most accepted amongst theorists, very peaceful among one another, only likely to go to war against non allies. 3) Systematic; This is a union of states like the UN or NATO. In most literature on the this topic the two main views or interpretations of this theory (Normative logic & Institutional logic)…show more content…

Democratic Peace Theory The concept of the Democratic Peace Theory is based on the idea that whether states are likely to go to war or choose peace depends on the type of political system they have.

There are three sub divisions 1) Monadic; Democracies that tend to be generally peaceful and are not likely to go to war, although people (can you identify people) who argue this only examine the years 1960-1970.
2) Dyadic; This version is the most accepted amongst theorists, very peaceful among one another, only likely to go to war against non allies. 3) Systematic; This is a union of states like the UN or NATO. In most literature on the this topic the two main views or interpretations of this theory (Normative logic & Institutional logic) can be formed.
In my opinion there is better transparency in the Institutional logic, for this reason I have based my essay on why I think this is the case with reference to many studies carried out over the last half a century.

Few findings in political science have been scrutinized so closely as the “democratic peace,” the identification that democracies almost never fight other democracies (Doyle 1983; Russett 1993). To some, the truancy of military conflict among democracies is so invariable that it approaches the status of an “empirical law” (Levy 1988)

Some authors and theorists have strived to explain the democratic peace by drawing attention to the role of public opinion. They witness that democratic leaders are beholden to

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