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Essay Jim Crow Law American History

Essay about Jim Crow Laws in the United States

1460 Words6 Pages

Imagine living in a world where you are harassed because of your skin color. Imagine knowing that is all you can look forward to. That is all your children and grandchildren can look forward to. Discrimination has been around for a long time, even before prehistory. Someone always thinks that they are better than others because of their skin color, sex, race, etc. Social classes and slavery are just two examples of discrimination. Even though our Constitution is based on freedom, our own Constitution allowed for discrimination of African Americans for around 100 years. It allowed White people to harass Black people. If we base our country on giving freedom to everybody, shouldn?t it include everyone? Discrimination against Blacks was…show more content…

Some laws went into great details as to not allow Whites and Blacks to use the same books in a classroom. The race that starts to use a book first was the race that got to keep the book. Some other examples of various interpretations of the laws are: in Georgia Blacks and Whites weren?t allowed to play baseball together, in Alabama White nurses weren?t allowed to treat Black men but were allowed to treat Black women, and in Virginia in movie halls, White and Blacks sat in different sections of the hall. Offenders of the laws usually paid a fine between $25- $1,000. Offenders rarely served time in jail, but if they did spend time in jail, they usually served between 1 day to 1 year in jail ?Elizabeth 7?.
There were many lawsuits that tried to stop the Jim Crow Laws. Some lawsuits against Jim Crow laws are: Guinn versus United States, Buchanan versus Warley, Smith versus Allwright Irene, Morgan versus Virginia, Delaware-Gebhart versus Belton, South Carolina-Briggs versus Elliot, Virginia ? Davis versus County School Board of Prince Edward County, Washington, DC ? Bolling versus C. Melvin Sharpe, McLaurin versus Oklahoma State Board of Regents, NAACP versus Alabama, and Boynton versus Virginia. All of these cases helped stop the Jim Crow laws in small ways. Some of the more influence cases are: Loving versus

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Reconstruction And The Jim Crow Laws

The Reconstruction era was a time when the government thought that all people needed human rights even African Americans. Until this point African Americans had no rights. They were still considered less than a full person in a society that proclaimed that all of God's people are created equal. The national debate over reconstruction began during the civil war. Laws were put into place that gave African American rights but they failed drastically. The reconstruction was most definitely a failure because of the implementation of the Jim Crow laws.

Before one can understand the reasons why the reconstruction era failed that must understand what the reconstruction era was. It was the period of time that followed the Civil War it is perhaps one of the most controversial periods in American history. It is traditionally portrayed as a sordid time when vindictive Radical Republicans fastened black supremacy upon the defeated Confederacy (Foner). However the issue of reconstruction emerged early in the war and attracted increased attention as northern victory neared. Reconstruction provided the U.S. with the thirteenth, fourteenth and fifteenth amendments. These amendments were designed to protect the rights of Southern blacks and restrict the political power of former confederates (Reconstruction). Basically reconstruction was supposed to provide equal rights to everyone regardless of race. What the American people thought was the end of the debate of equal rights for African Americans was just the beginning. Ending in 1877 reconstruction was over but the fight for equal rights had just begun.

In 1877 the Democratic party had gained control of the government on the southern states and these Democrats wanted to pass local and state laws the specified certain places for whites only and other for colored only. Blacks had separate schools separate seating in movie theaters and even separate water fountains. Many of the facilities that black had were poorer and more run down then those of the white people. The laws that allowed state governments to do this were known as Jim Crow laws. For the next 75 years Jim Crow signs went up to separate race in every possible aspect in life.

Jim Crow laws would never have been too able to pass by if the reconstruction laws had been as solid as the people thought that they were. Since the reconstruction laws were made to give all people civil rights but the Jim Crow laws came about and knocked down everything that the reconstruction era had established. Jim Crow laws still acknowledged that African Americans were citizens but they stated that they were a lower class of people not letting them move up society. According to these laws African American could not share the same bathrooms, water fountains, bus seats, movie theaters and any other public...

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